Distance Learning

AP Psychology

1 year | 1 credit 

The fundamental concepts of psychology should be familiar at some level to anyone because they address much of what makes us human – perception, sensation, emotion, personality, learning, memory, stress, and social behavior. This course explores how our biology is turned into personality through the functions of perception, consciousness, emotion, and motivation, as well as higher-order functions such as memory, learning, and language. How humans act when surrounded by others in societies is examined through the lenses of social psychology and psychological disorders.

This course will prepare students for the AP Psychology exam. In addition, students will have the opportunity to register for course credit through Syracuse University. The teacher is an adjunct professor.

SPONSORING COLLEGE: Syracuse University (SU)
PSY 205 – Foundations of Human Behavior

Dairy Science

1/2 year | 1/2 credit 

A broad overview of the dairy industry. Students will study the economic impact of the dairy industry, know historic events that have impacted the industry, identify different types of housing facilities as well as have a basic understanding of marketing dairy products. Students will research important feed types for a cow’s diet, how to interpret records and recognize diseases by symptoms and how to treat them. Students will learn how to manage a dairy business.

Equine Science

1/2 year | 1/2 credit 

Equine Science is a course designed to enhance the understanding of equines and their required care. Students will develop a deeper understanding of career opportunities, industry expectations, knowledge and skills related to the care and maintenance of horses. In addition, students will learn about the various species and breeds of horses, and their body parts, systems, and requirements.

If you are interested, contact your guidance counselor

Abnormal Psychology

1/2 Year | 1/2 credit | Grades 11-12

Abnormal Psychology is an introductory course to the field of abnormal psychology. We will explore abnormality within historical, social, and cultural contexts, as well as the various predominating paradigms. Each major disorder, its symptoms, and preferred treatment strategy will be examined using case material to supplement the chapter text. Throughout the course, we will look at major research issues as they relate to both the causes of each disorder and the efficiency of current treatments and interventions. It is also anticipated that you will gain an appreciation for the complexity of human behavior and increased compassion for individuals with mental illnesses. Content covers assessment, description, theory, research, causes, and treatments of various psychological maladaptive behaviors and disorders. Some mental health problems studied include anxiety disorders, personality disorders, substance disorders, sexual disorder, depression and other neuroses and psychoses.

 

Accounting

1 year | 1 credit | Prerequisite – Algebra 1

Students learn about the keeping of business and financial records. Course content encompasses the complete accounting cycle. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to keep a simple set of books. Students planning to work in a business or to major in business in college will find this course very beneficial. This course can be used as a third mathematics course.
Students have the option of earning college credit through the College in the High School program at Fulton-Montgomery Community College at a reduced rate of tuition.
SPONSORING COLLEGE: Fulton-Montgomery Community College (FMCC)

– ACC 101 – Financial Accounting

Marine Science

1 year | 1 credit 

Marine Science is a one-year course about the ocean and life in the ocean. Some of the topics we will cover are ocean exploration, ocean properties, marine environments, marine invertebrates, and marine vertebrates. The course includes hands-on projects, computer-based projects, as well as traditional lecture-based instruction. Students will also participate in interactive virtual field trips throughout the school year to Dolphin Research Center in Florida.

The 60s

1/2 year | 1/2 credit | Grades 11-12

The 60s course will provide an overview of the social, cultural, and political events of the 1960s in America. Major topics of study will include the Civil Rights Movement, The Vietnam War, the Red Scare, Counterculture and the Kennedy and Johnson administration.

Art History

1 year | 1 credit | Prerequisite: Studio Art

Art Historyt is a survey course designed to introduce students to art of the Unites States and of other cultures. The course is chronological, starting with art of the non-western hemisphere and ending with the Renaissance of Europe in the first semester, while semester two starts with the High Renaissance and ends with Contemporary Art. The intent of this course is to teach students to think deeper and longer on the subject, as well as compare the art of today to other movements in time. The course fosters a deeper understanding of why art was made, what the artist was thinking, how visual art relates to the culture in which it was made, and the evolution of art through time. 

Introduction to Statistics

1 year | 1 credit | Algebra 2 Recommended

Intro to Statistics will cover basic concepts of probability and descriptive and inferential statistics including central tendency, variability, correlation, regression, and parametric tests.

Wildlife and Natural Resources

1 year | 1 credit | Grades 11-12 | Prerequisite – Successful completion of Earth Science or Living Environment

This course delves into the environment, natural resources, ecosystems, soils, land use, chemicals in the environment, and water and air quality. Additionally, this course includes instruction on the history of wildlife management, ecological concepts, habitat assessment, habitat management techniques for wildlife, population dynamics, predator-prey relationships, wildlife species biology and identification, human-wildlife conflict resolution, the role of hunting in conservation, game and fish laws and regulations, hunters safety, and the application of scientific principles to managing wildlife habitat and populations.

Female Activism in America

1 year | 1 credit

This course is designed for students who are interested in women’s studies. Students will learn the importance of individuals, events and movements that have served to challenge the female archetype throughout the course of history. They will improve their reading and writing skills through a variety of activities and assignments that focus on these individuals, events and movements. A number of primary and secondary sources will be used to give the students the background knowledge that they will need in order to arrive at their own conclusions as to how effective these individuals and movements have been in challenging the stereotypical role of women throughout history. The course will culminate in a final project or final exam.

History of the Holocaust

1/2 year | 1/2 credit | Grades 11-12

This half-year course is an exploration into the causes and consequences of the Nazi Holocaust. This course will begin by taking an in-depth look into the roots of anti-Semitism dating to the earliest days of Judaism. The class then examines European Jewish life during the first half of the century, considers the development of Nazism, and discusses Nazi efforts to eliminate those marked as “a-socials” in German society. As a discussion based course, we will pay close attention to the variety of ways that Jews and other targeted groups responded to this crisis. Finally, it examines a number of survivor accounts and the impact that survivors have on the world today. Students will be expected to participate in daily discussions, readings, individual research, and presentations to obtain a deeper understanding of how hate can led to genocide and the impact the Holocaust has on the world today.

History of American Sports

1 year | 1 credit

This Social Studies elective class will examine the development of sport(s) in America as well as throughout world history. Our historical study will focus on helping students gain a better

understanding of the inner relationship that sport has on social, economic, cultural and political forces that are at work in the United States as well as the world. We will examine the historical context as well as the significance of gender, race, ethnicity and social class. We will do our historical investigation through readings, primary sources, audio and visual materials as well as class discussions and guests. We will unlock the mystery “hold” that sport has on the American public through our analysis and discussion.

Students will gain historical knowledge about the historical origins and development of various sports in America as well as worldwide, major political, social, cultural, economic, and intellectual concepts throughout chronological history of sport. Students will understand why and how sports have become a popular cultural phenomenon. Students will also learn a greater appreciation for the issues that have affected sports such as gender, discrimination, race bias, and class economics. Students will also begin to recognize the influence that commercialization has within the sports world.

Educational Podcast Production – Can you Hear US now?

1/2 year | 1/2 credit

Using our platform from our own educational podcast called the Missing Chapter Podcast, students will learn how to create, edit, and distribute their own creative & educational podcast.

Sports Statistics

1/2 year | 1/2 credit | Algebra 1 and Geometry required

We will explore phenomena that happened in sports, we will have mostly projects in the course with some quizzes.

The Mobile App Entrepreneur

1/2 year | 1/2 credit

The Mobile App Entrepreneur is an integrated Entrepreneurship, Marketing and Computer Applications course designed to let the student be the owner of his/her own mobile app company. The course challenges the student to embark on an exciting entrepreneurial journey, giving the student in-depth, real-world experience into what it’s like to run their own mobile app business. From designing the app icon and projecting annual revenue to delivering a final pitch presentation, the student will use their creativity, business, and computer applications skills to develop all the documents they’ll need to launch and promote the next must-have mobile app based on their own original idea. Knowledge of basic productivity software is a MUST.

Course Outcomes:

Throughout this course, you will be challenged to develop he following major skills:

  • Developing your own original mobile app idea
  • Using design skills to establish your company’s branding and identity
  • Using computer applications software to complete a comprehensive real-world business simulation
  • Using creativity and design skills to produce professional business documents
  • Applying technical writing skills in developing business documents
  • Using planning and decision-making skills
  • Applying marketing skills to develop promotional materials

Student Responsibilities:

  • Students are expected to read and follow directions in the textbook and come to class prepared to learn. Daily assignments are expected to be completed during class.
  • Students are expected to hand in work on the due date. If necessary, accommodations for special arrangements must be made in advance.
  • Students must have basic working knowledge of using any application or version of the following software: *Drawing or illustration software (Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop or equivalent) *Word processing (MS Word, Google Docs, or equivalent) *Spreadsheets (MS Excel, Google Sheets, or equivalent) *Desktop publishing (MS Publisher, or equivalent) *Presentations (MS PowerPoint, Google Sheets, or equivalent) *Google Forms or equivalent software *Google Sites or equivalent software.

Sports and Society

1 year | 1 credit

A must for sports enthusiasts, this course will emphasize the close connection between athletics and society at large. Through the reading of selected texts, the viewing of various films, the writing of critical essays, and their active participation in analytical weekly class discussions, students will consider the extent to which athletics serve as a lens through which we may examine a variety of social issues. Topics of emphasis will include the following: academics, coping with failure, discipline, economics, ethics, evaluation, goal setting, interpersonal skills, leadership, parental interference, problem solving, race-related issues, and self-evaluation. One of the highlights of this course is the fantasy football unit, which includes the opportunity for some friendly competition among the members of the class.

  • Potential Texts: Friday Night Lights, Leading with the Heart, Coach Wooden’s Pyramid of Success, Moneyball
  • Potential Films: Remember the Titans, Finding Forrester, Hoosiers, Coach Carter, Field of Dreams, The Jackie Robinson Story, and various films from ESPN’s 30 for 30 series
  • Evaluation: Graded formal essays, journal entries, and class participation

Introduction Hospitality and Tourism Management I

1/2 year | 1/2 credit

Introduction to HTM provides basic training for hospitality positions in the rooms and food and beverage divisions of a lodging operation, including front desk, reservations, housekeeping , bell services, banquet setup and service and more. Guest service, professionalism and career exploration are other important components of this course. Hospitality & Tourism is the No. 2 industry in New York State and of prime importance to the economy of the Adirondack North Country Region and many of its counties, including New York City.

Program Syllabus includes the following topics:

  • World of Hospitality
  • Guest Service
  • Careers & Professionalism
  • Safety & Security
  • Rooms Division
  • Front Desk Representative
  • Reservationist
  • Bell Attendant
  • Guest Room Attendant
  • Maintenance Associate
  • Laundry Attendant
  • Public Space Cleaner
  • Food & Beverage Division
  • Restaurant Server
  • Banquet Setup Staff
  • Banquet Server
  • Bus Person

Articulation Agreements with cooperating two and four year colleges are future possibilities, as well as courses for more in depth study leading to a variety of Hospitality Industry Certifications through participating members of the American Hotel & Lodging Association (Educational Institute) and the NYS Hospitality & Tourism Association.

Introduction Hospitality and Tourism Management II

1/2 year | 1/2 credit

Introduction to HTM provides basic training for hospitality positions in the rooms and food and beverage divisions of a lodging operation, including front desk, reservations, housekeeping , bell services, banquet setup and service and more. Guest service, professionalism and career exploration are other important components of this course. Hospitality & Tourism is the No. 2 industry in New York State and of prime importance to the economy of the Adirondack North Country Region and many of its counties, including New York City.

Program Syllabus includes the following topics:

  • World of Hospitality
  • Guest Service
  • Careers & Professionalism
  • Safety & Security
  • Rooms Division
  • Front Desk Representative
  • Reservationist
  • Bell Attendant
  • Guest Room Attendant
  • Maintenance Associate
  • Laundry Attendant
  • Public Space Cleaner
  • Food & Beverage Division
  • Restaurant Server
  • Banquet Setup Staff
  • Banquet Server
  • Bus Person

Articulation Agreements with cooperating two and four year colleges are future possibilities, as well as courses for more in depth study leading to a variety of Hospitality Industry Certifications through participating members of the American Hotel & Lodging Association (Educational Institute) and the NYS Hospitality & Tourism Association.